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It's been five years since Microsoft released Office 2011 for the Mac, so the absence of any major, headline-grabbing new features could be seen as something of a disappointment. However, Office 2016 for Mac does make sense when seen as part of Microsoft's attempt to provide a 'unified' look and feel that allows Office users to move easily across platforms and devices.

At the moment, Office 2016 for Mac is available as a free upgrade for users who have an existing subscription to Office 365. Businesses with volume licensing agreements with Microsoft can upgrade for free as well, although they have to wait until August. There will also be a conventional boxed version of the suite released in September. Microsoft was unable to confirm UK pricing for that version ahead of its release, although it's likely to be similar to the current £219.99 (inc. VAT) for the Home and Business edition of Office 2011 for Mac.

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Road warriors could always count on Samsung releasing a new Note in the fall with the highest specifications, microSD expansion card support, removable battery, gorgeous display, and S Pen functionality. That's no longer the case.

As Samsung continues to compete with Apple and change its design to more closely match the iPhone, the microSD card and removable battery features are now gone.

Samsung made these core design changes when it launched the Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge. When I wrote about these major changes, many commenters expressed disappointment with the news while stating they trusted that Samsung would keep these two features reserved for the Note line.

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Windows 10 isn’t really free. Realizing why and how it isn’t really free can help you understand why installing the operating system on 1 billion systems by 2017 is such a big deal for Microsoft—and why this version of Windows is very different at its core than Windows 7 and its predecessors.

Let’s get the “free” part out of the way before we dive into that, though.

Sure, you can go snag a free Windows 10 upgrade right now if you’re running Windows 7 or Windows 8—but that doesn’t mean Windows 10 is free. Buying a fresh Windows 10 license still costs $100-plus, and PC makers still pay Microsoft a fee for each and every computer that ships with Windows installed. Linux is free. The Windows 10 upgrade is only “free” for people who have already purchased a Windows license, be it via a standalone license or bundled with a premade PC. You can’t just go download Windows 10 and install it on a new PC without spending some cash.